Call for Papers: Libori Summer School 2019

Call for Papers: Libori Summer School 2019 – Teaching Women Philosophers The Call for Papers for the 3rd Libori Summer School is now open! For the third year in a row, the Libori Summer School will be held by the Center for the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists in Paderborn, Germany. This year’s summer school takes place from July 29th to August 2nd at Paderborn University. This conference provides a platform for experts to present and further their work on women philosophers in cooperation with peers. This opportunity for networking allows researchers to experience an inspiring community, and exchange…
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Book Announcement: Travel and Travail: Early Modern Women, English Drama, and the Wider World

Travel and Travail: Early Modern Women, English Drama, and the Wider World Patricia Akhimie and Bernadette Andrea, eds. University of Nebraska Press, 2019 Popular English travel guides from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries asserted that women who wandered too far afield were invariably suspicious, dishonest, and unchaste. As the essays in Travel and Travail reveal, however, early modern women did travel, often quite extensively, with no diminution of their moral fiber. Female travelers were also frequently represented on the English stage and in other creative works, both as a reproach to the ban on female travel and as a reflection…
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November 2018 – ‘She said’: women’s authority, #MeToo and Margaret Cavendish

Joanne Wright for the SSEMW Blog In 1989, students and staff at Columbia University hung a 170-foot wide banner off the top of Butler Library featuring the names of women writers, from Sappho and Christine de Pizan to Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz and Virginia Woolf. As Laura Brown, who designed and made the banner, pointed out, “Great women do not get their names inscribed on buildings.”[1]  To this end, the Columbia University Banner Project provided a symbolic counterweight to the list of iconic Western men that permanently adorn the building in stone. Later, in 1994, when designing another banner…
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Women and Public Worship: SSEMW-Sponsored Seminar at SAA 2019

If you are interested in women's participation in public worship (via communal prayer, preparation for church services, sponsorship of church architecture or other churchstuffs, etc.), please consider joining the SAA seminar that Micheline White and Jaime Goodrich are leading: Women and Public Worship (seminar 60). This seminar is sponsored by SSEMW, and we would love to see as many SSEMW members there as possible! The deadline to enroll is September 15th, and you can do so by visiting http://www.shakespeareassociation.org/.
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New book – Chivalry, Reading, and Women’s Culture in Early Modern Spain

The Iberian Chivalric romance has long been thought of as an archaic, masculine genre and its popularity as an aberration in European literary history. Chivalry, Reading, and Women's Culture in Early Modern Spain contests this view, arguing that the surprisingly egalitarian gender politics of Spain's most famous romance of chivalry has guaranteed it a long afterlife. Amadís had a notorious appeal for female audiences, and the early modern authors who borrowed from it varied in their reactions to its large cast of literate female characters. Don Quixote, and other works that situate women as readers, carry the influence of Amadís…
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May 2018 – Uncomfortable Alliances, Embarrassing Relations: Resisting and Reclaiming Intersectionality

Christina Luckyj for the SSEMW Blog Coalitions, especially intersectional ones, can make for strange bedfellows. Many of us who advocate for early modern women writers might well avert our eyes if those women appeared on our street corners to hawk their religious pamphlets - just as they in turn might cast a censorious glance in our direction as we scurried past. “For various reasons, I sometimes feel uncomfortable about all this work on early modern religious texts,” tweeted Helen Smith on April 5 2018, citing her “lifelong atheism” as one reason for her discomfort. “The #nuntastic hashtag, great though it…
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What’s in a Name? Debating the Addition of “Gender” to “Society for the Study of Early Modern Women”

for SSEMW by Anna Wainwright May 5, 2018 At this year’s Renaissance Society of America annual conference in New Orleans, the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women hosted its second of four roundtables this year on the question: Should the Society change its name, adding “and Gender” after “Women”? The possibility of the name change has come up over the years and was proposed for discussion last year by the last president of the Society, Meredith Ray; the conversation has been taken up by the current president, Julia Hairston, through the organization of four roundtables over the course…
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February 2018 – Activism and Intersectionality, Storytelling and Audience

Niamh J. O'Leary for the SSEMW blog As I write this post, the first anniversary of the Women’s March has just passed. Hearing the theme of this year’s SSEMW blog, early modern intersectionalities and activism, I thought of the waves of activist energy that moved across the United States this past year, an activism that, in its best incarnation, strives to be intersectional. I wondered what early modern texts could teach today’s young activists about intersectionality, and how the work I’ve done on the political alliances of female characters on the early modern stage might provide insight for contemporary activism.…
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November 2017 – Early Modern Intersectionalities and Activisms

Merry Wiesner-Hanks for the SSEMW Blog In January of this year, a group of us from Milwaukee joined the hundreds of thousands at the Women’s March in Washington, an experience that even those among us who were veterans of many protests will never forget. (You can see our group as the banner on my Facebook home page, as I can’t bear to change the picture.) As was true for many others, our experience began in the airplane on the way there, when we realized that almost everyone on the plane, even those women in pearls and heels, was going to…
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May 2017 – Creative Women on the Move: Two Transnational Celebrities, An Actor and a Calligrapher

Sarah Ross for the SSEMW Blog Early-modern women moved. Even if much prescriptive literature consigned women to domestic drudgery in fixed abodes, their lived experiences often evinced considerable mobility artistically, spiritually, intellectually, and physically — as readers of this blog series are now well aware. Joining the conversation, I would like to (re)introduce to readers two fascinating women who crossed multiple borders, in multiple senses: Isabella Andreini (c.1562-1604) and Esther Inglis (c.1571-1624). Andreini and Inglis had a great deal in common, even if at first glance they seem to have inhabited very different worlds. The Italian Andreini earned accolades as a…
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